The Coronavirus Poses a Big Threat to Refugees and People in Humanitarian Crisis

According to the latest data from the World Health Organization, the Coronavirus outbreak, known as Covid-19, has spread to over 60 countries. Over 88,000 people have been sickened and over 3,000 have died from the novel coronavirus. The number of cases of coronavirus are increasingly daily. So far, though, most of these cases are in countries with a decent health system, including China and South Korea.

But there is increasing concern among health experts about the potential impact of the coronavirus epidemic among populations that live in extremely vulnerable circumstances — including refugees and people displaced by conflict and humanitarian crisis.  To understand the potential impact of this coronavirus outbreak on vulnerable populations around the world is Dr. Paul B. Spiegel. He is the director of the Center for Humanitarian Health at the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, where he also works as a professor.

Dr. Spiegel explains that he is immediately concerned about the implications of Covid-19 spreading among the densely populated Rohingya refugee camps in Bangladesh, as well as more broadly the implications of the spread of coronavirus to humanitarian crises and countries with weak health systems, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa.


Back to Top

People

Mustafa Kamal Sikder

Dr. Sikder studied long-term and short-term drinking water supply interventions...

Read More

Eileen Shields-West

Eileen Shields-West served as a correspondent of TIME Magazine and San Francisco...

Read More

Jason M. M. Spangler

Jason M. M. Spangler, MD, MPH, FACPM is Executive Director of Value, Quality,...

Read More

Natalia Golub

Natalia completed her MD, PhD training at the University of Rochester School of...

Read More

Michel J.J. Thieren

Dr Michel Thieren began his career in 1989 with Médecins sans...

Read More

Events

S
M
T
W
T
F
S
·
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
·
·
·
·