Infant and Young Child Feeding In Emergencies (IYCF-E)

 

              Scientific Literature Repository

                                                                                                                                                                                                     

 

This repository provides an overview of what peer-reviewed journal articles currently state on Infant and Young Child Feeding in an emergency context. It covers articles published since 1st January 2022.

The repository will be updated with the latest research every three months, thanks to a collaboration between the Johns Hopkins Center for Humanitarian Health at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University, and the Gillings School of Global Public Health at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Click here to access the repository


Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear (CBRN) Threats In War Time Situations: The Impact on Breastfeeding Safety and Infant/Young Child Feeding Practices

In today’s modern warfare, there is an increased risk of Chemical,Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear (CBRN) weapons use and of nuclear emergencies due to damage to existing nuclear power plants. Most international agencies and ministries of health have guidelines for the general population about what to do in the event of a CBRN emergency. However, an urgent gap exists in guidance specifically for the breastfeeding population. It is known that in wartime situations, women and young children are often the most vulnerable and most impacted. While information exists in the literature across different organizations and publications, there is no one place where agencies or individuals can go to access vital information about the safety of breastfeeding in CBRN crises.  

The Infant Feeding in Emergencies (IFE) Core Group, a global collaboration of agencies and individuals that addresses policy guidance and training resource gaps on infant and young child feeding support in emergencies, took up the initiative, along with the Johns Hopkins Center for Humanitarian Health and Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security to create guidelines for the breastfeeding population in the context of CBRN threats.  The following guidance notes detail the mechanisms of the most common CBRN agents, management, and treatment, and make recommendations for breastfeeding and infant feeding for policymakers and for people who will provide guidance for health facilities in the case of CBRN emergencies. 

The project was originally initiated in response to attacks on nuclear power plants and the risk of chemical and biological warfare in Ukraine. It is written for a wider context, as it became clear that the information was also needed for other parts of the world and for future crises.

                                                                                                                            


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